“Esos minerales son para curación del mundo”: Amarakaeri, Tunta Nain, y Yaigoje-Apaporis

Gracias al Foro Indigena Mundial Sobre el Agua y la Paz por compartir  esta entrada semanal  donde se llama la atencion a la deforestacion y los efectos de la mineria en el Peru y en Colombia.

Hoy, continuando con nuestro post sobre la victoria legal de la nación Sarayaku en la Amazonía ecuatoriana, queremos recomendar el documental People From the Amazon and Climate Change (2014), un testimonio sobre ecoturismo indígena en dos áreas protegidas de la Amazonía peruana: la Reserva Comunal Amarakaeri, y la Reserva Natural Tuntanaín. Además, pensando en estas áreas protegidas, queremos reflexionar sobre el Parque Yaigoje-Apaporis en la Amazonía colombiana, y las enseñanzas Makuna sobre los minerales. (JGS)

 

“THOSE MINERALS ARE MEDICINE TO THE WORLD”: AMARAKAERI, TUNTANAIN, AND YAIGOJE-APAPORIS

mapa AmazonasAmazonia. Map: http://www.imeditores.com/banocc/amazonia/mapas.htm

(LEA LA VERSION EN ESPAÑOL ABAJO)

The Amazonia forest spans eight South American countries—Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela—and one foreign possession, French Guyana. Following our post about the Sarayaku’s legal victory in the Ecuadorian Amazon, today we would like to recommend the documentary People From the Amazon and Climate Change (2014), a testimony on indigenous ecoturism projects in two protected areas in the Peruvian Amazon: Amarakaeri Comunal Reserve, and Tuntanain Natural Reserve. Thinking about protected areas, we would like also to reflect on the Yaigoje-Apaporis Park in the Colombian Amazon, and the Makuna teachings about the minerals.

Watch People From the Amazon and Climate Change here =>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIKKlIynklc

One always listens and reads about how the Amazonia is the lungs of the planet, however, in order to visualize its magnitude, we would like to underline some statistics. According to the National Geographic Magazine Climate Issue (November 2015):

There are 713 protected natural areas and 2467 indigenous territories in Amazonia. They cover 51 percent of the region—an expanse larger than India (…) A tenth of the world’s species are thought to live in Amazonia (…) Half the world’s tropical rain forests [Igapó, Várzea, and Terra firme] are found in Amazonia (…) Amazonia is a huge carbon sink. Its soil and vegetation hold roughly a fourth of all the world’s carbon that’s stored on land. But scientists say a tree die-off in the past decade is shrinking the region’s capacity to absorb the planet’s carbon. (NGO Climate Issue)

There is not doubt that there are global consequences from hurting the Amazon forest, but we need to acknowledge that indigenous peoples and local communities are the front-line defenders. Currently, as we learn from the protagonists of People From the Amazon and Climate Change, one of the main concerns of the Harakmbut and Matsigenka nations in the Amarakaeri Comunal Reserve, and the Awajun and Wachipaeri nations in the Tuntanain Natural Reserve, is on food security. Floods in the dry season, foreign fungus on the trees, unusual worms in the meat of hunted mammals, and displacement of species such as turtles and fish, are all symptoms of climate change that they have experienced. For Harakmbut Chief Walter Yuri, fortunately, they have the Amarakaeri Comunal Reserve where they can still get their medicines, meat, fish, and birds—the healthy foods of their diet.

MapaDeforestation around Communal Reserve Amarakaeri. Map: El Comercio

Nevertheless, as the “development projects” grow in the Amazonia, natural reserves and the people who inhabit the forest are being cornered. Felix López, from the Awajun nation, explains the impact of industrial forestry:

Speaking of climate change, there used to be a lot more timber trees, like tornillo, mahogany and cedar, and they help the crops grow, they fertilize it, but there aren’t any now. The loggers are exterminating the timber trees, and as there aren’t any trees anymore, the sun burns right down on the plant, and so it takes longer to grow, and it lacks fertilizer. (People From the Amazon and Climate Change)

Indeed, there are culprits of climate change. The detailed maps of the Amazon in the climate issue of National Geographic show the area’s richness in minerals such as gold, copper, and iron, as well oil and gas. But they also explain the consequences of deforestation, mega-dams, and mining (including roads and pipelines) in the ecological balance between the rainfall, the Andean spring waters, river flows, flooding season, and life:

Both [oil and gas] are economic mainstays of Ecuador and Peru. Today 107 blocks are producing oil and gas in Amazonia, most of them in the Andes [nearly nine-tenths]; 294 more potential blocks could mean more roads and more deforestation (…) The Amazon is the world’s largest river system. Hydropower supplies more than a third of Ecuador’s and Bolivia’s electricity and about a fourth of Peru’s. But deforestation is reducing rainfall and river flow, which also hinders fish migration between the mouth of the Amazon and the upper watershed. (NGO The Climate Issue)

In the Colombian Amazon, there is currently a paradox: after more than sixty years of civil war, nation-state government is in peace negotiations with the guerrillas, and as a result of this historical event, isolated provinces such as Vaupes, Caqueta, and Amazonia are in the sights of transnational and illegal mining. One example, among many (see the case of La Macarena Serrania), is the project of COSIGO Resources’, a Canadian mining company, in the Natural Park Yaigoje-Apapaporis, the sacred birthplace of the Macuna, Cabiyarí, Tuyuca,Tanimuca, Letuama, Yauna, Barasana, Yujup and Puinave nations.

mapa_apaporis

National Park Yaigoje-Apaporis. Picture:http://www.territorioindigenaygobernanza.com/col_14.html

The Apaporis area—between the Orinoco Great Plains and the Amazon forest—has been in the sights of colonial enterprises for centuries. The Apaporis forest resisted the thirst for quinine, curare (a natural sedative), and natural rubber during the 19th Century, and the slavery by the Tropical Oil Company in the 20th Century. As the renown journalist Alfredo Molano explains, one of the main reasons for this colonial failure has been the indomitable Apaporis River, the river of mirrors, full of waterfalls that make it impossible to navigate. According to the Makuna tradition, it was formed when the Tree of the Beginning fell and its trunk and branches created the river’s broken hydrography (read Molano’s article).

On October 27th, 2009, the Natural Park Yaigoje-Apaporis—a cultural and natural reserve of 1 060 603 acres—was created as an initiative of the Yaigoge Indigenous Chiefs Association (Aciya) with the support of the Colombian Ministry of Environment. The park is part of the “Gold Belt of Taraira”, which crosses Brazil and Colombia. As Alfredo Molano also explains in 2011, during Alvaro Uribe’s presidency, the Ingeominas, the Colombian institution that regulates mining, accepted 23 more applications to exploit gold in the park. Some of these applications were signed by Andrés Rendle, COSIGO’s vice-president for South America. The application process cost approximately 500 dollars, but when the license was approved, it could be sold for millions. On August 31st, 2015, the Colombian Court ordered to suspend any mining activity in the area. However, there is still uncertainty about what this company is planning to do with these mining titles, which are supported by international trade treaties (read “Indigenous Peoples of Yaigoje Apaporis Victorious as Court Ousts Canadian Mining Company”)

Beyond the legality or non-legality of the mining projects, and beyond Canadian or Colombian responsibility, there is an old confrontation between two different mind-sets, as we have addressed in the last few weeks. One of the main questions to start this conversation is: What does nature mean? Followed by: What does gold, oil or water mean? And, finally: Why are we consuming so much energy, and how can we change our habits? For the miner’s mind-set, nature is just a resource to be exploited. The COSIGO’s vice-president, Andrés Rendle, for example, thinks that the “Colombian noise” about their project is surprising. In his words: “It’s just a flea in the Amazon”. His discourse of clean technology and profit for Colombia is weak, particularly in the context of the statistics above. On the other hand, when the Elder Makuna Gerardo was asked about his point of view about mining, he said that the Makuna knew about those minerals, but didn’t touch them because they were always located in sacred areas:

Those minerals will cure the world. If one exploits them, they will bring consequences for the communities (read the full article)

Furthermore, the place that COSIGO is interested in is called Yuisi. And, according to the Pira River Chiefs, Yuisi “is where the energy that regulates and revitalizes life is concentrated”. Yuisi is the Jaguar Backwater, a sacred place for the Apaporis medicine men, a place not to be touched because it belongs to the underworld spirits. In this mind-set, completely contrary to the position taken by the Canadian mining company, nature has its own owners, people from the underworld and the Water people. Despite the mining companies disregard of this message, the first peoples of these forests clearly know what they are talking about.

In the Avina Foundation’s report about the impact of mining on Amazonia (read in Spanish full document here), we can find several testimonies of Chiefs, Elders, peasant miners, and Shamans from the Caqueta River, who have already suffered terribly from gold mining. Over and over, we can read the same comments: the mining projects bring the collapse of the family, prostitution, alcoholism, selfishness, illness, and death in the river produced by chemicals. After reading these testimonies it seems this collapse has an explanation in the traditional beliefs: gold, emeralds, quartz, and diamonds are the organs of our planet, they are also houses of spirits who know how to tie and control diseases. If someone breaks these shrines, these energies will ask a high price to compensate for the imbalance. There is a reason why these minerals are in specific places and not in others. This is one of the Elders’ comments about the Canadian Company’s project:

If we allow that the Canadian company exploits the gold where we consider there is a sacred place, a lot of problems will come: children’s disease and death, crimes among indigenous and white people, war between the guerilla and the army, prostitution, and in the end nobody will respect each other, nor the culture or the tradition. (Fundación AVINA 27)

Today, we would like to end our post with Leila Salazar-López’s words in Amazon Watch: Building Indigenous Alliances for the Climate:

We need more supporters. If we want to stop climate change, we have to protect the Amazon rain forest. It’s the lungs of the planet. And to do that, we have to support indigenous peoples’ rights” (watch documentary)

Until next week!

***

Esos minerales son para curación del mundo”: Amarakaeri, Tuntanain, y Yaigoje-Apaporis

Colparques Yaigoje Apaporis

Parque Yaigoje-Apaporis. Foto: Colparques

La selva amazónica se expande a lo largo de ocho países suramericanos – Bolivia, Brasil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Perú, Suriname, y Venezuela – además de una posesión extranjera, la Guyana Francesa. Hoy, continuando con nuestro post sobre la victoria legal de la nación Sarayaku en la Amazonía ecuatoriana, queremos recomendar el documentalPeople From the Amazon and Climate Change (2014), un testimonio sobre ecoturismo indígena en dos áreas protegidas de la Amazonía peruana: la Reserva Comunal Amarakaeri, y la Reserva Natural Tuntanaín. Además, pensando en estas áreas protegidas, queremos reflexionar sobre el Parque Yaigoje-Apaporis en la Amazonía colombiana, y las enseñanzas Makuna sobre los minerales.

Ver People From the Amazon and Climate Change AQUI =>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIKKlIynklc

Siempre escuchamos y leemos que la Amazonía es el pulmón del planeta, sin embargo, para poder visualizar su magnitud, nos gustaría subrayar algunas estadísticas. De acuerdo al número sobre cambio climático de la National Geographic (Noviembre de 2015):

Hay 713 áreas naturales protegidas y 2467 territorios indígenas en la Amazonía. Estos cubren 51% de toda la región –una extension más grande que la de la India (…) Un décimo de las especies del mundo se cree que viven en la Amazonía (…) La mitad de las selvas lluviosas tropicales [Igapó, Várzea, y Terra firme] se encuentran en la Amazonía (…) La Amazonía es un disipador gigante de carbón. Su suelo y vegetación contienen aproximadamente un cuarto de todo el carbón del planeta guardado en la tierra. Pero los científicos dicen que la tala y la mortandad de árboles en la última década está reduciendo la capacidad que tiene de absorver el carbón. (Revista aquí)

Al herir la selva amazónica, no hay duda de que hay consecuencias globales, y ahora mismo necesitamos reconocer que las comunidades indígenas y locales que habitan esa selva son sus defensores de primera línea. Actualmente, como escuchamos de los protagonistas de People From the Amazon and Climate Change, una de las preocupaciones principales de las naciones Harakmbut y Matsigenka en la Reserva Comunal Amarakaeri, y las naciones Awajun y Wachipaeri en la Reserva Natural Tuntanain, es la seguridad alimentaria. Desde su propia experiencia, las inundaciones en el tiempo seco, los hongos no habituales en los árboles, los gusanos en la carne de los mamíferos, el desplazamiento de especies como tortugas y peces, son todas pruebas del cambio climático. Para el líder Harakmbut Walter Yuri, afortunadamente hoy ellos tienen la Reserva Comunal Amarakaeri, donde aun pueden obtener medicinas, carne, pescado, aves, y demás productos de su dieta. ¡Es como un supermercado¡, dice riendo.

Mapa

Deforestación alrededor de la Reserva Comunal Amarakaeri. Fuente: El Comercio

Sin embargo, a medida que los “proyectos de desarrollo” crecen en la Amazonía, las reservas naturales y las comunidades que las habitan están siendo arrinconadas. Félix López, de la nación Awajun, explica el impacto de la industria forestal con las siguientes palabras:

Hablando de cambio climático, antes había muchos más árboles altos y perennes, como el tornillo, el mahogany y el cedro, y estos ayudaban a que los cultivos crecieran, ellos fertilizaban, pero ahora no hay ninguno. Las máquinas han exterminado estos árboles, y ya que no hay ninguno, el sol cae directamente sobre las plantas, entonces toma más tiempo para que crezcan, y hay falta de fertilizantes naturales. (People From the Amazon and Climate Change)

En efecto, el cambio climático tiene responsables directos. Los mapas detallados de la National Geographic que mencionábamos arriba, describen la riqueza de la Amazonía en minerales como el oro, el cobre, el hierro, además de los hidrocarburos. Estos mapas ilustran las consecuencias de la deforestación, las mega-represas, y la industria minera (incluidas sus carreteras y ductos) en el balance ecológico entre la lluvia, los manantiales de montaña, las corrientes, las inundaciones y la vida en la selva:

Ambos (gas y petróleo), son los pilares económicos de Ecuador y Perú. Hoy hay 107 sitios explotando gas y petróleo en la Amazonía, la mayoría de ellos en los Andes (casi 9 décimos); otros 294 potenciales sitios de explotación significarían más carreteras y deforestación (…) El Amazonas es el sistema de ríos más largo del mundo. Las hidroeléctricas suplen más de un tercio de la electricidad de Bolivia y Ecuador, y más o menos un cuarto de la de Perú. Pero la deforestación está disminuyendo la caída de agua lluvia y la corriente de los ríos, lo que a su vez impide la migración de los peces entre la boca del río Amazonas y las cuencas.” (Leer revista aquí)

Por su parte, en la Amazonía colombiana, hay una paradoja actual: tras más de sesenta años de Guerra civil, el gobierno nacional está ahora mismo negociando la paz con las guerrillas, y como resultado de este momento histórico, las regiones más apartados de los centros urbanos como el Vaupés, el Caquetá y el Amazonas, están en la mira de la minería transnacional e ilegal (leer aquí “La estrategia del despojo” de Alfredo Molano”).

Semana Yaigoje

Foto: Revista Semana. Audios e imágenes en “Parque Apaporis Mina”http://www.semana.com/especiales/parque-apaporis-mina/

Un ejemplo entre muchos (ver el caso reciente de la Serranía de La Macarena) es el de Cosigo Resources en el Parque Natural Yaigoje-Apaporis, el sagrado lugar de origen de la naciones Macuna, Cabiyarí, Tuyuca,Tanimuca, Letuama, Yauna, Barasana, Yujup y Puinave, entre otras. En la lengua yerar – según explica Alfredo Molano – “apaporis” significa “el centro del universo” y, al mismo tiempo, funciona como el verbo “transformar”. El caudal de su río, quebrado por continuas caídas de agua, ha dificultado por siglos que los colonos ingresen. Eso sin contar que desde los años ochenta ha sido uno de los epicentros del conflicto armado en Colombia. Por todo ello, el Apaporis ha sobrevivido a la sed de la quinina, el curare, el caucho, y la esclavitud de la Troco (Tropical Oil Company). Hoy otra “criatura” acecha el Apaporis: la urgencia de explotar el “cinturón de oro de Taraira” (escuche aquí la charla “Apaporis. Viaje a la última selva” de Alfredo Molano).

El 27 de octubre de 2009 se creó el Parque Natural Yaigoje-Apaporis en una área protegida de 1’060.603 hectáreas. Sin una explicación clara hasta el momento, dos días después de la creación del parque como área protegida, COSIGO obtuvo un título minero de explotación en un área de 2000 hectáreas dentro del parque. Durante los últimos meses del gobierno de la “seguridad inversionista” de Álvaro Uribe, Ingeominas aceptó veintitrés aplicaciones más para extraer oro del parque, algunas de las cuales fueron firmadas por Andrés Rendle, el vicepresidente para Suramérica de COSIGO. El 31 de Agosto de 2015, la Corte Constitucional de Colombia ordenó suspender actividades mineras en la zona (leer la noticia completa). Sin embargo hoy, hay incertidumbre sobre lo que esta compañía planea hacer con estos títulos mineros, respaldada por tras tratados de libre comercio que el estado colombiano ha firmado.

Más allá de la legalidad o ilegalidad de la minería, y más allá de la responsabilidad de Colombia o Canadá, existe aquí una vieja confrontación entre dos modos de pensar – como lo hemos sugerido en las últimas semanas. Acaso una de las primeras preguntas que nos tenemos que hacer para empezar la conversación es: ¿Qué queremos decir cuando hablamos de “naturaleza”? Seguido por: ¿Que significa para nosotros el oro, el petroleo, el agua?

Desde la perspectiva de la industria extractiva, la naturaleza solamente es un recurso que está allí para explotar. El vice-presidente de Cosigo Resources, Andrés Rendle, por ejemplo, piensa que es “insólito el alboroto” que se ha hecho alrededor del proyecto; para él, dos mil hectáreas del Apaporis son solo “una pulguita en el Amazonas” (leer el informe de Alfredo Molano). Desde la concepción opuesta del territorio, cuando al mayor Gerardo Makuna se le preguntó sobre el punto de vista de su comunidad, éste dijo que ellos siempre han sabido de la existencia de esos minerales, pero saben que no los deben tocar porque reposan sobre lugares sagrados:

Esos minerales son para curación del mundo. Y si se explotan trae consecuencias graves para subsistencia de comunidades” (leer la noticia“Indìgena acepta que minera lo asesoró para ‘tumbar’ Parque Nacional Yaigoje-Apaporis” de Pablo Correa).

Uno de los lugares en que la empresa Cosigo está interesada es justamente un punto llamado Yuisi, una cascada en la que termina un pequeño macizo montañoso conocido como la Serranía de la Libertad. Para los médicos tradicionales makuna, Yuisi no debería ser tocado porque pertenece a los espíritus del agua y del inframundo. Desde la ontología makuna, completamente opuesta a la de la compañía minera, el oro que Cosigo pretende extraer ya tiene dueño desde el origen. A pesar de que estas empresas ignoran estas opiniones, es claro que las primeras naciones de estas selvas saben muy bien de lo que están hablando (leer “Indigenous Peoples of Yaigoje Apaporis Victorious as Court Ousts Canadian Mining Company).

En la investigación Contribuciones locales a una historia de la minería en la Amazonía colombiana (Documento completo. Fundación AVINA 2013), se pueden leer voces del subsuelo y los yacimientos a unos kilómetros del Apaporis, testimonios de autoridades indígenas, campesinos mineros, y chamanes del río Caquetá, quienes ya han sufrido el impacto de la industria extractiva del oro. Una de las voces de los médicos tradicionales entrevistados advierte:

Si dejamos que la empresa canadiense saque el oro donde consideramos queda un lugar sagrado nos trae muchos problemas: enfermedades causando muerte a los niños y adultos; problemas como crímenes entre indígenas, luego entre blancos; llega la guerrilla, el ejército, la prostitución, por último, ya nadie se respeta entre ellos, ni respeta su cultura, y comienza a desaparecer la cultura de los paisanos. (Fundación AVINA 27)

Una tras otra, todas las voces coinciden: con la minería siempre llega la prostitución, el alcoholismo, la envidia, la enfermedad y la muerte generada por los químicos en el río, fracturando el núcleo familiar y las prácticas ancestrales. Según las voces recogidas en este informe, todos esos males que llegan con la minería son el resultado de maltratar y urgar los órganos de la tierra, es decir, el oro, las esmeraldas, los cuarzos, los diamantes, pues estos son el hogar de espíritus que atan y controlan las enfermedades (ver documental sobre suicidios en el Vaupés: La Selva Inflada).

Hoy nos gustaría finalizar nuestro post con las palabras de Leila Salazar López en un documental sobre la reunion reciente en París sobre Cambio Climático, Amazon Watch: Building Indigenous Alliances for the Climate (2016):

Necesitamos más colaboradores. Si queremos detener el cambio climático, tenemos que proteger la selva húmeda amazónica. Ella es el pulmones de nuestro planeta. Y para protegerla, necesitamos apoyar a los pueblos indígenas en la defensa de sus derechos. (ver Amazon Watch: Building Indigenous Alliances for the Climate)

Hasta la próxima semana!

“AND EVERYTHING WE DO, WE ARE RESPONSIBLE”: HUDBAY MINERALS

Coincidiendo con el premio Goldman a la Sra. Maxima Acuna en su resistencia a la minera Yanacocha,  compartimos la entrada semanal del Foro indigena mundial sobre el aguna y la paz, que esta semana se centra en Hubbay Minerals, que tien intereses en  Canada, Guatemala, Estados Unidos, Peru, etc. a traves del documental Fin Flon Flim Flam de John Dougherty y el testimonio mama   Mona (PolaccaHavasupai/Hopi/Tewa).

 

“AND EVERYTHING WE DO, WE ARE RESPONSIBLE”: HUDBAY MINERALS

IMG_0294

Santa Rita Mountains, Arizona. Picture: Mona Polacca

LEA LA VERSIÓN EN ESPAÑOL ABAJO

Eight weeks ago, we started a cycle of posts on the struggles and alternatives to defend the Water of the Abya-Yala and the Turtle Island. Today, inspired by the documentary Flin Flon Flim Flam(2015) by John Dougherty (InvestigateMedia), we would like to share a personal account of Grandmother Mona Polacca, co-secretariat of the Indigenous World Forum on Water and Peace, and take a moment to reflect upon the intentions of our blog in the Information Era.

bio-pic-2015mona

Gradmother Mona Polacca

THE STORY

Mona Polacca is a Havasupai/Hopi/Tewa Elder from Arizona (seehttp://www.grandmotherscouncil.org/who-we-are/grandmother-mona-polacca). When we were writing this post, we asked for her guidance and she sent us this powerful story. Thank you, Mona!

…I was on a drive through southern Arizona. I was commenting to my friend, Austin Nunez (the Chairman of the Wa:K Community AKA San Xavier District of the Tohono O’odham Nation) how I was feeling the spirit and heart of the land as we were driving through the desert. I had mentioned that I needed to take pictures because I had never been to this area before yet, felt de-javu, that I had been there in my dream. I also had the thought that, “maybe this will be the only time I will see this place like this!

I thought he didn’t hear me since he kept driving and I was trying to take pictures while we were moving, you know how that goes! Anyway, he suddenly pulled off the road at a viewpoint looking down across the valley and mountains. He then told me about the Rosemont Mine, and that this landscape I was admiring would soon be the largest open-pit copper mine in the western hemisphere. I was saddened. I asked him, “What are you doing about it?”. He responded, “We are opposed to it, and we are fighting to stop it”.

A few days later, I drove there on my way to the Apache Springs Horse Ranch, which is located near the proposed Rosemont site and the Cienega Springs mentioned in the film. That’s when I noticed this amazing mountain range, Santa Rita Mountains in the distance, there was an area that had snowcaps, so “beautiful” I thought, “must take a picture”. I tried, while I was driving – a big “no no”, especially when driving on a narrow winding road!! I decided to wait until I could turn off the road and stop, and decided that if the mountains were no longer in view, I could accept that, after all I had the memory stored where I will always have it with me. So, when I came to the road I had to take to the horse ranch, as I drove to the ranch there before me was the mountains, the part that had the snowcaps! I was over-whelmed by what I saw! I cried and said, “You are a guardian spirit woman mountain, they cannot destroy you”! I continued my drive to the ranch, which turned out to be sitting below this special part of the mountain. I asked the owners of the ranch, “Do you know that that mountain is very sacred?” they said, “Yes, and we are doing everything we can to take care of the space she has given us to use”. I was happy to know that, I thought, these would be supporters and/or defenders of the Santa Rita Mountains from the Hudbay mining proposal.

While at the ranch, I made a wonderful relationship of unconditional love and acceptance with a horse named Cochise. I made a promise to him and all the other horses that I would make prayers for protection of their home. And so it is – I am making prayers in that way…

FLIN FLON FLIM FLAM

At the convergence of damage and hope, Flin Flon Flim Flam weaves together interviews and facts about four different mining projects orchestrated by the Canadian-based Transnational Company Hudbay Minerals: Mine 777, and Reed Mine in the Grass River Provincial Park (Flin Flon, Manitoba, Canada), El Estor, Lote 8, and Vigil’s Mine in Maya Q’ech’i territory (Guatemala), Constancia Mine in Uchucarco (Chumbivilcus Province, Perú), and the Rosemont Project in the sacred Santa Rita Mountains (Arizona, US).

WATCH Flin Flon Flim Flam => https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7aacPtEI8s&feature=youtu.be 

The facts and statements collected in the movie are both disturbing and encouraging, thus our post today would like to acknowledge the resourcefulness and bravery of its protagonists. Despite the fact that Flin Flon’s aquifer and soil are full of metal concentrations—a consequence of the 85 years of irresponsible operations by Hudbay Minerals—Mathias Colomb Cree Nation and Chief Arten Dumas are fighting back! Although the Peruvian nation-state police are violently repressing the Uchucarco community protests, Quechua advocates are denouncing the damage of heavy traffic on the road, copper dust in the air, and the failure of the company in fulfilling job quotas. In Toronto, Hudbay Minerals is being sued by Angelica Choc, German Chub, and eleven women from the Q’eqch’i nation. By holding a Canadian company accountable for the acts of an overseas subsidiary, this lawsuit is endeavouring to set a precedent for future incidences (read article in the New York Times).

Finally, despite the 1872 General Mining Law, which encourages companies such as Hudbay Minerals to continue destroying the land in Arizona and the rest of the USA, a coalition between the City of Tucson, the Pima County, the Yaqui Nation, the Tohono O’odham Nation, and several Congressional representatives, are together protecting the Santa Rita Mountains, the heart of the Cienaga Springs, a habitat of twelve endangered species such as the wild jaguar and the ocelotl (read http://www.rosemontminetruth.com).

We have borrowed the title of our post, “And everything we do, we are responsible”, from the Hudbay Minerals’ President and CEO David Garofalo, whose words in the documentary are incongruous with the actions of his company. By contrasting Garofalo’s speech with Hudbay Minerals’ actions, Flin Flon Flim Flam reminds us of the power of resistance in subverting discourses.

Flin Flon Flim Flam is both asking for action and reflection: action to stop these four projects (especially Rosemont, which has not yet started); and reflection on the words and the actions of its protagonists, including our own, as contemporaries. Beyond the tired categories of Third and First World, the documentary shows how the mining industry is affecting indigenous and local communities regardless of the location—in Canada, USA, Peru or Guatemala. Corruption, impunity, and lack of regulation are present in all of these scenarios. As a response, the documentary underlines how decisive intercultural initiatives can be. Ray Carroll, Pima County’s AZ Supervisor, explains his county’s major concern:

Why sell tomorrow to pay for today, is the opinion of most of the people that I represent.

We want to believe that our blog is a way of action, and sharing information in Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media with our friends and family are ways of action, too! Despite the amount of violence and damage caused by mining projects and reproduced by the mass media and news, in acknowledging indigenous and local organization who are defending Water, we are part of a global stream of consciousness concerned with Water for future generations.

Thus, we hope you share with us your comments, and spread these posts among your friends and family. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you would like to publish news related to water in your community.

Until next week!

~~~

“De todo lo que hacemos, nosotros somos los responsables”: Hudbay Minerals

IMG_0293

Las montañas de Santa Rita a lo lejos. Foto: Mona Polacca

Ocho semanas atrás comenzamos este ciclo de notas sobre problemáticas y alternativas para defender el agua en la Isla Tortuga (Norteamérica) y el Abya-Yala (América toda, la tierra en plena madurez Tule-Guna). Hoy, inspirados en el documental Flin Flon Flim Flam (2015) dirigido por John Dougherty (InvestigateMedia), queremos compartirles una historia personal de la abuela Mona Polacca, co-secretaria del Foro Indígena Mundial Sobre el Agua y la Paz, y hacer una pausa para visualizar la intención de este blog en la Era de la Información.

LA HISTORIA

Mona Polacca es guía espiritual de las naciones Havasupai/Hopi/Tewa de Arizona (ver http://www.grandmotherscouncil.org/who-we-are/grandmother-mona-polacca). Cuando estábamos escribiendo esta entrada, le pedimos su consejo, y ella nos envió la historia que copiamos a continuación. ¡Gracias, Mona!

… Yo estaba viajando por el sur de Arizona. Le estaba comentando a mi amigo Austin Nuñez, el presidente de la comunidad Wa:K AKA del Distrito de San Xavier de la Nación Tohono O’odham, cómo estaba sintiendo el corazón y el espíritu de esa tierra mientras atravesábamos el desierto. Yo había dicho que necesitaba tomar fotos porque nunca había estado en esta área antes, sentía como dejavu, como si yo hubiera estado allí en mi sueño. También tenía el pensamiento: “¡Tal vez esta será la única vez que vea este lugar así!”

Pensé que no me había escuchado porque él continuó manejando y yo estaba tratando de tomar fotos mientras nos movíamos, ¡tú sabes cómo es eso! En fin, de pronto él se salió de la carretera y paró en un mirador desde donde se veían las montañas y el valle. Entonces me habló sobre la Mina Rosemont, y que ese paisaje que yo estaba admirando pronto sería la mina de cobre a cielo abierto más grande en el hemisferio occidental. Yo me puse triste. Le pregunté: “¿Qué están haciendo ustedes?”. Él me respondió: “Estamos en contra, y estamos luchando para detenerlo.”

Unos días después, pasé por allí de camino al rancho de caballos Apache Springs, el cual está ubicado cerca del sitio propuesto para la mina, y también de Cienaga Springs, el cual mencionan en la película [Flin Flon Flim Flam, ver abajo]. Ahí fue cuando caí en cuenta de esta maravillosa cadena montañosa, las montañas de Santa Rita en la distancia, había una área con casquetes de nieve, “¡qué hermoso!”, pensé, “tengo que tomar una foto”. Traté mientras estaba manejando, pero “no, no”, sobre todo en una angosta y ventosa carretera. Decidí esperar hasta que pudiera parar, y si las montañas no estaban entonces en el panorama, tendría que aceptarlo, pues después de todo tenía la memoria guardada y siempre las tendría conmigo. Entonces cuando llegué a la carretera que tenía que tomar, mientras manejaba hacia el rancho de caballos, ahí estaban ante mí las montañas, ¡la parte que tenía los casquetes de hielo! ¡Yo estaba abrumada por lo que veía! Lloré y dije: “Tú eres guardián, mujer espíritu de la Montaña, ¡ellos no pueden destruirte!” Continué manejando hacia el rancho, el que terminó ubicado justo debajo de esa parte especial de la montaña. Les pregunté a los dueños del rancho: “¿Ustedes saben que esta montaña es sagrada?”. Ellos dijeron: “Sí, y estamos haciendo todo lo que podemos para cuidar el espacio que ella nos ha permitido usar”. Yo estaba feliz de saberlo, y pensé, “ellos deben ser defensores de las montañas de Santa Rita contra el proyecto minero de Hudbay”.

Cuando estaba en el rancho, hice una relación maravillosa de amor incondicional y aceptación con un caballo llamado Cochise. Le hice una promesa a él y a todos los otros caballos, que yo haría oraciones para proteger su casa. Y así es, estoy haciendo oraciones hacia esa dirección…

FLIN FLON FLIM FLAM

En la convergencia entre el daño y la esperanza, Flin Flon Flim Flam teje entrevistas y hechos relacionados con cuatro proyectos mineros orquestados por la compañía transnacional con base en Canadá Hudbay Minerals: la mina 777 y la mina Reed en el Parque Estatal Grass River (Flin Flon, Manitoba, Canada), las minas de El Estor, Lote 8 y Vigil en territorio Maya Q’ech’i (Guatemala), la de mina de Constancia en Uchucarco (Provincia de Chumbivilcus, Perú), y el proyecto Rosemont en las montañas sagradas de Santa Rita (Arizona, US).

VER Flin Flon Flim Flam (español, inglés, quechua y q’eqch’i) =>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7aacPtEI8s&feature=youtu.be 

Los hechos y declaraciones compiladas en la película son a un mismo tiempo dolorosos y estimulantes, y por ello hoy queremos reconocer la recursividad y valentía de sus protagonistas. Apesar de que el acuífero y el suelo de Flin Flon están hoy llenos de metales concentrados, a consecuencia de 85 años de operaciones irresponsables por parte de Hudbay Minerals, ¡la nación Mathias Colomb Cree y el Jefe Arten Dumas están resistiendo! Apesar de que la policía del estado-nación Perú está reprimiendo violentamente las protestas de la comunidad Uchucarco, defensores Quechua están denunciando los daños del tráfico pesado en la vía, del polvillo de cobre en el aire, y el fracaso de la compañía en sus promesas de empleo. Actualmente, Hudbay Minerals está siendo demandada en Toronto por Angélica Choc, German Chub, y once mujeres de la nación Q’ech’i, y al hacer responsable a una compañía canadiense de los actos de una filial en el extranjero, este caso está fijando un precedente para futuras luchas (leer la nota reciente en el New York Times).

Finalmente, apesar de la Ley General de Minería de 1872, la cual apoya compañías como Hudbay Minerals a continuar destruyendo los recursos hídricos de Arizona y del resto de los Estados Unidos, una coalición entre la ciudad de Tucson, el condado de Pima, la nación Yaqui, la nación Tohono O’odham, y algunos congresistas, están trabajando juntos para proteger las montañas de Santa Rita, el corazón de Cienaga Springs, hábitat de doce especies en vía de extinción en Estados Unidos, incluidos el jaguar y el ocelote (ver: http://www.rosemontminetruth.com/).

Hoy hemos prestado el título de nuestro post, “De todo lo que hacemos, nosotros somos los responsables”, del presidente y director ejecutivo de Hudbay Minerals, David Garofalo, cuyas palabras en el documental son incongruentes con las acciones de su compañía. Al contrastar el discurso de Garofalo con las acciones de Hudbay Minerals,  Flin Flon Flim Flam nos recuerda la fuerza de subvertir los discursos.

Este documental nos invita al mismo tiempo a actuar y a reflexionar: actuar en contra de estos cuatro proyectos (especialmente el de la mina Rosemont, la cual no ha comenzado aun), y a reflexionar sobre las palabras y los actos de sus protagonistas, incluidos nosotros mismos como contemporáneos de estas problemáticas. Más allá de las desgastadas categorías de Primer y Tercer mundo, el documental demuestra cómo la industria extractiva está afectando comunidades campesinas, indígenas y locales igual en Canadá que en Estados Unidos, Perú o Guatemala. Corrupción, impunidad, y falta de regulación están presentes en todos estos escenarios. Como respuesta, el documental subraya lo decisivas que pueden llegar a ser las iniciativas interculturales. Ray Carroll, Supervisor del condado de Pima, explica la mayor preocupación de su condado:

Para qué vender el mañana para pagar el hoy, esa es la opinión de la mayoría de la gente que yo represento.

Nosotros creemos que este blog es una forma de acción, y compartir en Facebook, Twitter o cualquier otra red social, con nuestros amigos y nuestra familia ¡son formas de acción! Apesar de la cantidad de violencia y daño causados por los proyectos mineros, al reconocer las organizaciones locales e indígenas que defienden el agua, estamos siendo parte de una corriente global de conciencia, dispuesta a proteger el agua para las futuras generaciones.

Estaremos esperando sus comentarios. ¡Pasen la voz entre amigos y familia!

No duden en contactarnos si quisieran publicar alguna noticia/alternativa/iniciativa relacionada con el agua de su comunidad.

¡Hasta la próxima semana!

FROM KANESAHTAKE TO ELSIPOGTOG: RESISTANCE AND INSISTENCE

Tomado del blog hermano Foro Indigena Sobre el agua y la Paz, en donde nos enteramos, entre otras cosas que el 70 potcinto del territorio peruano esta consecionado a las mierias. Pensando en este dia en las mujeres  peruanas y de mundo que son guarianas de las lagunas, del  agua, la tierra y la vida.

FROM KANESAHTAKE TO ELSIPOGTOG: RESISTANCE AND INSISTENCE

Aboriginal People’s Television Network reporter Ossie Michelin's iconic photo of Amanda Polchies in Elsipogtog, October 2013.

Aboriginal People’s Television Network reporter Ossie Michelin’s iconic photo of Amanda Polchies in Elsipogtog, October 2013

(LEA LA VERSION EN ESPAÑOL ABAJO)

In Imperial Canada Inc (2012), Alain Deneault and William Sacher, professors at the University of Montreal and McGill University respectively, explain how Canada has emerged as a paradise for transnational mining companies due to five main factors. First, the permissiveness of the law toward the mining industry and its role in the Toronto Stock Exchange, which speculates mainly on the extraction of “natural resources”. Second, the complicity of Canadian banks; by creating tax havens in Caribbean branches, the profits of the industry never reach Canada but are multiplied in Antillean countries where the mining business has derisory taxes. Third, many Canadians unconsciously invest in mining, on the Toronto Stock Market, through their savings, investments and pension system. Fourth, the colonial imprint of the British Empire on Canadian history, which was built upon the expropriation of indigenous lands and mining in the Northwest Territories and in the Athabasca area. And, fifth, the complicity of the media, which refuses to talk openly about it.

            Recently, the Idle No More movement has reminded us that Canadian mining not only affects other countries but the ancestral lands of Turtle Island itself. Between May and October 2013, the Mikmak nation resisted the aggressive advance of the gas shell extraction projects (fracking) in Elsipogtog (New Brunswick). Civil disobedience, the songs of women, and the beat of drums called the attention of activists and independent journalists, and made the front pages of national newspaper. In an episode reminiscent of the Oka crisis of 1990—when the residents of Kanesahtake wanted to build a golf course on a traditional Mohawk cemetery—the Mikmak confronted the Texas Southwestern Energy Co. (or SWN, based in Houston), forcing the company to stop its project of tearing up the land and polluting the aquifer and deep water fields where moose and black bear have lived forever.

            According to the statistics of MiningWatch (http://www.miningwatch.ca/), 30% of Mexican territory, 40% of Colombian territory and 70% of Peruvian territory are now under mining concessions and under titles owned by companies such as Goldcorp, Barrick Gold, HudBay Minerals, Pacific Rim, Oceana Gold, Infinito Gold, Gold Marlin, Tahoe Resources. Companies that are, in turn, being sued for multiple human rights violations (Tahoe Resources in El Escobal, Guatemala, with cases of Angelica Choc and Cris Santos Perez and Lot 8 with HudBay Minerals, Guatemala, are some examples).

            To exacerbate the issue, some of these companies are now suing the nation-states of Mexico and El Salvador for huge sums of money because they have been unable to carry out their contracts. Today, the model that Canadian mining companies are exporting to the world, according to Jennifer Moore, director of MiningWatch Latin America, can be summarized in the following points: to change the policies of the host countries; to privatize their land; to create lower taxes and expand royalties for the mining sector; and to criminalize public protest.

            This week we recommend two videos on indigenous resistance and insistence: the first is the classic “Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance” by Alanis Obomsawin (1993)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yP3srFvhKs; the second is “Elsipotog: The fire over water – Fault Lines” (2015), a journalistic documentary by Aljazeera on Mikmak resistance, the Idle No More movement, indigenous sovereignty, and the inconsistencies of the extractivism: https: // www.youtube.com/watch?v=9fleh95UWGo

            Until next week!

***

 

political-documentary-and-pov-8-638

 De Kanesahtake a Elsipogtog: resistencia e insistencia

            Alain Deneault y William Sacher – profesores de la Universidad de Montreal y de la Universidad de McGill respectivamente – han demostrado en Imperial Canada Inc. (2012)cómo Canadá se ha erigido hoy como el paraíso de la transnacionales mineras debido a cinco grandes factores. Primero, la permisividad de las leyes que regulan la industria extractiva y su protagonismo en la bolsa de Toronto, la cual especula principalmente sobre la extracción de “recursos naturales”. Segundo, la complicidad de los bancos canadienses al crear paraísos fiscales en sus sucursales caribeñas, de tal forma que las ganacias de la “criatura” nunca llegan a Canadá sino que se reproducen en países antillanos en los que el negocio minero goza de impuestos irrisorios. Tercero, el desconocimiento de quienes viven en ese país y que, sin saber, permiten que sus ahorros, inversiones y sistema de pensiones inviertan en la bolsa de Toronto. Cuarto, la huella colonial del Imperio Británico sobre la historia de la nación, construida sobre la expropiación de los territorios indígenas y la extracción minera en los territorios del Noroeste (Northern Territories) así como en el gran hoyo de Athabasca en la provincia de Alberta. Quinto, la complicidad de los medios de comunicación al rehusarse a hablar abiertamente del tema.

            Recientemente el movimiento Idle No More nos ha recordado que la extracción canadiense no solo afecta a otros países en el mundo, sino a los propios territorios ancestrales de la Isla Tortuga. Entre mayo y octubre de 2013, la nación mikmak resistió pacíficamente la agresiva avanzada de los proyectos de extracción de gas shell (fracking) en Elsipogtog (Nuevo Brunswick). La desobediencia civil, el canto de las mujeres, el sonido del tambor convocaron activistas y periodistas independientes, generando una alerta nacional. En un episodio que recordó a la crisis de Oka en 1990, cuando los vecinos de Kanesahtake quisieron construir un campo de golf sobre un cementerio tradicional mohawk, esta vez la “criatura” Texas Southwestern Energy Co. (SWN, con base en Houston) tuvo que detener su proyecto de desgarrar la tierra y contaminar el agua profunda del acuífero y los campos en que el alce y el oso negro han vivido desde siempre. Estos testimonios de resistencia y estas historias de insistencia protegiendo la tierra y la naturaleza son también voces del subsuelo y los yacimientos.

            Según las cifras de MiningWatch (http://www.miningwatch.ca/), el 30% del territorio mexicano, el 40% del territorio colombiano y el 70% del territorio peruano están hoy bajo consesiones mineras y bajo títulos de propiedad a nombre de empresas como Gold Corp, Barrick Gold, Hudbay Minerals, Pacific Rim, Oceana Gold, Infinito Gold, Marlin Gold, Tahoe Resources, entre muchas otras; compañías que tienen a su vez múltiples demandas por violación a los derechos humanos (Tahoe Resources en El Escobal, Guatemala, con los casos de Angélica Choc y Cris Santos Pérez; y Lote 8 con Hudbay Minerals, Guatemala, son algunos ejemplos).

            Con un cinismo sin precedentes, algunas de estas mismas empresas están demandando hoy a los mismos estados-nacionales como México y El Salvador por sumas descomunales ante la imposibilidad de llevar a cabo sus contratos. El modelo que ha exportado la minería canadiense – según Jennifer Moore, directora para Latinoamérica de MiningWatch – se puede resumir en los siguentes puntos: hay que cambiar las políticas de los países anfitriones, hay que privatizar su tierra, hay que bajar los impuestos y las regalías para el sector minero en dichos países, y hay que criminalizar la protesta pública

            Por toso esto, esta semana queremos recomendarles dos videos sobre resistencia e insistencia indígena: el primero es el clásico “Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance” de Alanis Obomsawin (1993) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yP3srFvhKs; el segundo es “Elsipotog: The fire over water – Fault Lines” (2015), un documental de Aljazeera sobre la resistencia en Nuevo Brunswick, el movimiento Idle No More, la soberanía indígena y las incosistencias del proyecto minero: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9fleh95UWGo

            Hasta la próxima semana!

Rechazamos represion contra la poblacion Grauina en favor de la gran mineria

Rechazamos en los mas energicos terminos la represion brutal contra la poblacion Grauina, legitima y consetudinaria propietaria de las riquezas minerales de la Bambas, perpetrada por la policia en favor de la gran mineria. Muy mal de parte del gobierno en aumentar  su larga cuenta de muertos y heridos en favor  las grandes mineras que no aportan nada ni al pais  ni a las zonas  donde operan, que son las mas pobres. Es tiempo ya que se legisle en favor de los legitimos propietarios de las riquezas minerales, en favor de la consulta previa,  y el respeto a los derechos humanos y culturales de las poblaciones afectadas, contra las cuales pesa ademas  la prensa neoliberal, igualmente responsable de estos crimenes.

TV Peru: policia mata tres campesinos en protesta conta las Bambas

11218688_946636805425439_7080193708878947542_n12088108_946649445424175_6710270637497697054_n

12039196_861917937228857_7013437223502947425_n

12063484_946649525424167_4581263125801733283_n

CARTA ABIERTA AL PRESIDENTE DEL PERU DE ESCRITORES, INTELECTUALES Y ARTISTAS SOBRE ESTADO DE EMERGENCIA EN EL VALLE DE TAMBO

 Mas de cien academicos peruanos y extranjeros  rechazan declaración de estado de emergencia en provincia de Islay donde la población